Choose Love

I had a chat today with another Mom in town; her son plays regularly with my boys. Although we’ve talked many times, we’ve never really crossed the bridge into friendship. Today however, we had some honest conversation, that makes me feel like we may one day be friends.

In our conversation, she told me her son had asked about my Girlfriend and I and she told him quite simply, ‘just like at our house there’s a Mommy and Daddy, its like a Mommy and Mommy.’ Apparently he nodded and happily continued on with whatever he was doing, and she commented that although kids are curious, they really don’t care.

And that’s exactly the point; when we don’t make a big deal about things, neither do kids. They truly have an intuitive acceptance for others, provided we don’t teach them otherwise.

Which begs the question, why do so many people choose intolerance?

When adults talk about things that are different (whether that be religion, race, sexuality of anything else) without judgement and without prejudice, not only are we choosing acceptance, we are spreading a message of tolerance to our children and future generations of society.

So I urge you, choose acceptance, choose tolerance and above all, choose love.

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So homo

I love that my girlfriend has helped me embrace the humour of gay stereotypes. Last week, I pulled up in my lifted truck, wearing my flannel and listening to loud pop music and I had to giggle as she smiled while announcing I was ‘so homo’.

The first time I heard her say something was ‘so gay’, ‘so homo’ or ‘gayer than us’ I was surprised and a little bit confused. Was it ok to say that? Ok to laugh? I’ve come to realize that its all about the intent.

As gay women, we may be walking a fine line by using words that historically have had negative connotations, but its our choice to own them. It is our perogative to find joy and humour in societies perceptions. The truth is, as individuals and as a couple, we DO fit some gay stereotypes and that’s OK.

We are living our truth, being ourselves and finding our unique brand of happy and that includes embracing our sexuality and our place within a world that is evolving in its acceptance of those that don’t meet traditional expectations.

So when my girlfriend tells me my body language screams gay, I wear that label with pride and a smile on my face, because it turns out, I am in fact, ‘so homo’.